Keep Ha‘ikū Lands in Community Hands

 

‘Aina Alert: O‘ahu investors are offering future investors from around the globe a chance to “make your oceanfront living dreams a reality” on around 140-acres of former Pauwela/Ha’iku ag lands. At a recent Ha’iku Community  Association  meeting local residents were clear that they have a different dream. “It’s time for our community to speak up to protect the traditional uses of these lands,”  the Ahu Moku head for Hamakualoa told the large audience. “We need to show up at Maui County budget hearings in April and get our friends and ‘ohana to do the same.”

Maui residents are urged to send simple comments supporting inclusion of the 140 acres of Pauwela lands in the County’s Open Space budget.  Comments can be sent to the Maui County Council members here.

These Pauwela parcels stretch from Hana Highway all the way to the chiseled rock walls of the Pauwela pali and include the popular public trail that leads to the County Park at the Pauwela Light house.  “Its never a great idea to have a traditional public trail running through private lands,” says Nara Boone, a local educator and parent who “grew up walking these lands.”  Full disclosure: Sierra Club Maui offers popular seasonal hikes along this same historic trail!!

Boone and many other Ha’iku area residents are asking Maui County to secure this land with County Open Space funds to protect the traditional coastal access.  They also see the lands being far more valuable for future public uses like a an active park with playing fields and a possible new location for the fifty-year-old Ha‘ikū Community Center to expand. The aging, but hugely popular Ha‘ikū Community Center; the Ha‘ikū Youth Center and a small park that serves all of Ha‘ikū’s youth sports leagues, are presently squeezed into a lot barely five areas big- located right across the street from the  expansive Pauwela parcels being offered for sale to outsiders. “Which need is greater ?” Ha‘ikū mom Gloria Madden asked the crowd at the Ha‘ikū meeting. “Planning for our keiki’s future or selling off more ag estate lots for “dream homes?” .

Ha‘ikū kama’aina families need our support to get a strong turn out to upcoming County Budget meetings. Please show up or send in comments.

Provide testimony at any of the following meetings, with all meetings to start at 6 p.m.:

  • March 30, Lāhainā Civic Center, Social Hall, 1840 Honoapiʻilani Hwy, Lāhainā
  • March 31, Mitchell Pauʻole Community Center, 90 Ainoa St., Molokai
  • April 3, Pāʻia Community Center, Social Hall, 252 Hana Hwy., Pāʻia
  • April 6, Hāna High and Elementary School Cafeteria, 4111 Hāna Hwy., Hāna
  • April 10, Kīhei Community Center, Main Hall, 303 E. Līpoa St., Kīhei
  • April 12, Mayor Hannibal Tavares Community Center, Social Hall, 91 Pukalani St., Makawao
  • April 13, Lānaʻi High and Elementary School Cafeteria, 555 Fraser Ave., Lānaʻi City
  • April 14, Council Chamber, 7th floor, 200 South High St., Wailuku

PRESS RELEASE (March 21, 2023): Council tradition of evening budget meetings throughout the county to return starting March 30 | mauicounty.us.

Submit comments to the Budget, Finance, and Economic Development Committee meetings:

April 1
April 2
April 3
April 4
April 8
April 9
April 11
April 15

1 thought on “Keep Ha‘ikū Lands in Community Hands”

  1. I PLEAD with the County to save as much of the Haiku coastline and adjacent lands as possible. We do not need any more people on Maui! We already have enough problems & we hardly grow any of our food. We have far too much noise from tourists and traffic in some places is unacceptable. Please listen to the Sierra Club’s plans. I agree with them wholeheartedly.

    Islands are finite, with limited resources. They cannot endure constant development. Our water resources are limited. Out infrastructure has been developed enough and is not efficient. Let Maui learn from the consequences of overdevelopment on Oahu and many other islands in the world!

    I have lived and worked in Hawaii and Oceania since 1963 and seen too many changes. We only have one world … and one Maui.

    Reply

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