Welcome our new Group Manager, Kecia

Please extend a warm welcome to our new Maui Group Manager, Kecia Joy! For over thirty years Kecia Joy has been a dedicated environmentalist, marine biologist, educator, and wellness

practitioner with experience as team leader, director, and co-creator of innovative projects. She aspires to serve the planet with integrity through the journey of inner growth and a profound connection to the natural world.

Kecia strives to be a catalyst for the change we yearn to see in the world and is passionate about the environment—especially water! As Director of Education at the Maui Ocean Center, Pacific Whale Foundation, and Roundhouse Lab & Aquarium in California, she has created hundreds of educational programs, trainings, workshops, and leadership courses, and enjoys teaching and lecturing internationally. As a guide and mentor for the next generation of activists who will take a stand (and the action necessary) for a sustainable future, Kecia holds a vision for a thriving community and a healed world.

Kecia has a deep respect and reverence for Hawaiian culture, traditions, and practices. It is Kecia’s “highest honor to collaborate with all in our collective mission to protect and preserve the environment while bridging traditional teachings with new sustainable technologies.” Kecia is a roll up your sleeves and get it done kind of person. As our new Sierra Club Maui Director, you will find Kecia on the trails, in our legislative offices, leading activities and events, and much more.

With a vision of humanity in peaceful partnership with the land and sea, she aspires to co-create a blueprint for a sustainable Maui as a living example to the world of peace and aloha.

9th Circuit Court Rules in Favor of SC Maui and allies!

Big Update!

The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that the county’s use of injection wells at the Lahaina Wastewater Reclamation Facility since the early 1980s violates the federal Clean Water Act. Sierra Club Maui, Surfrider Maui, the Hawai’i Wildlife Fund, and West Maui Preservation Association first brought the lawsuit in 2012. Read our lawyerʻs press release here.

Testify for #OxybenzoneFreeMaui!

This testimony action has now ended.

 

Maui County could be the first in the world to pass legislation phasing out the sale and use of oxybenzone and octinoxate-based sunscreens!

Oxybenzone and octinoxate, two of the most common active ingredients in chemical sunscreens, are scientifically proven coral killers. We need to do everything we can to protect our reefs and the organisms that live off them. In December 2017, Maui County’s Council will vote on a bill that, if passed, will prohibit the use and sale of SPF products with these ingredients. To our knowledge, this would be the first legislation world-wide to legally phase out these chemicals.

Show your support for an #OxybenzoneFreeMaui:

Click on the link to send a letter to Maui’s legislators asking them to pass this bill, and SHARE WITH FRIENDS – https://mauisierraclub.org/campaigns/sunscreen/

Sand Mining Moratorium at the IEM (Item 33)

 

October 2017

Moratorium Updates

On the morning of Sept. 18th, IEM members Mike White, Yuki Lei Sugimura, and Riki Hokama announced they would not make the meeting, and so there was no quorum. The meeting went ahead with a GPS presentation demonstrating the exact areas where the moratorium would cover. Because there was no quorum, a vote on the moratorium was deferred.

http://www.mauinews.com/opinion/letters-to-the-editor/2017/09/absence-of-3-council-members-prevents-vote/

The moratorium (officially IEM item 33) was once again on the agenda for the Oct. 2nd meeting. At that meeting, Elle Cochran again introduced the moratorium and Alika Atay made a motion to vote on it. No one seconded the motion, and instead the item was once again deferred.

Soon after, Don Guzman’s office announced that he’d be introducing 2 new bills at the council meeting on Friday, October 6th. These items would address some of the zoning issues but would not introduce a moratorium and would not lead to any update of the 2006 Maui sand study that we desperately need.

http://mauinow.com/2017/10/04/council-member-to-propose-bills-to-protect-archaeological-cultural-sites/

The IEM Committee will be discussing the moratorium again at its meeting on October 30th at 1:30 pm.

September 2017

Lawsuit Updates

http://www.miamiherald.com/news/business/article176067891.html

http://www.mauinews.com/news/local-news/2017/09/judge-halts-maui-lani-earthmoving/

Judge Cardoza ruled in favor of the plaintiffs’ request for a preliminary injunction with regards to the 1st count of the lawsuit. As part of the injunction, he ordered that if Maui Lani Partners wants to work in their Phase 9 site, ML Partners need to inform plaintiffs 48 hours in advance and allow a representative from the plaintiffs to observe all work being done there. Mining at the Phase 9 site is already stopped because of the county order issued in spring 2017, so this court ruling provides extra protection.

Moratorium Updates

On Monday, September 18th, 2017 at 1:30 PM the County Council’s Infrastructure & Environmental Management (IEM) Committee will meet once again to discuss and possibly vote to pass a sand mining moratorium bill out of committee.

Stand up for ʻiwi kūpuna and our environment – come testify in support of the moratorium (County Council Chambers – 8th Floor, 200 S. High St., Wailuku) or send your testimony to iem.committee@mauicounty.usTalking Points You Can Use In Your Testimony

  • Protect the Culture and Environment: Mauiʻs sand is NOT a “land resource,” which is something to be bought and sold and is governed under zoning laws. Sand, especially the inland Maui sand dunes, is a environmental and cultural resource that needs special protection. The Maui Inland Sand dunes are well-known to be the final resting place of many ʻIwi Kūpuna and must be respected
  • Follow the $$$: Big business interests want Council to look the other way because their businesses profit greatly off the mining and selling of Maui sand. For example, Maui Lani Partners has made millions from selling this sand. These business interests are doing everything they can to make sure sand is not considered an environmental resource because that would hurt their profits. Please put the communityʻs interests over those of big businesses.
  • If Council Doesnʻt Do This…: Through comments given at previous IEM meetings on this issue, its clear that State Historic Preservation Division (SHPD) officials donʻt have the ability to properly enforce their own rules and the County departments issuing these permits have ignored lies on permit applications and not enforced their own rules. If Council doesnʻt pass this moratorium, ʻIwi Kūpuna will continue to be desecrated and Maui will lose all its inland sand.
  • Hold the Guilty Accountable: Council should hold accountable all those involved in the illegal activity that led to the resource extraction and desecration of ʻIwi Kūpuna. In addition to passing this moratorium, thereʻs a long paper trail of guilt and incompetence that must be examined.

Check out the agenda and documents for the previous July 31st and August 14th meetings, including the text of the bill, at http://mauicounty.us/agendas/  (Make sure you search for Infrastructure and Environmental Management agendas)

August 2017

Our op-ed was published

http://www.mauinews.com/opinion/columns/2017/08/stop-the-mining-and-preserve-the-central-maui-sand-dunes/

Testify Against Sand Mining at the IEM

On Monday, August 14th at 1:30 PM the County Council’s Infrastructure & Environmental Management (IEM) Committee will meet to discuss and possibly vote to pass a sand mining moratorium bill out of committee. The meeting was postponed from July 31st because they didn’t have quorum.

Stand up for ʻiwi kūpuna and our environment – come testify in support of the moratorium (County Council Chambers – 8th Floor, 200 S. High St., Wailuku) or send your testimony to iem.committee@mauicounty.us

Talking Points You Can Use In Your Testimony

  • Protect the Culture and Environment: Mauiʻs sand is NOT a “land resource,” which is something to be bought and sold and is governed under zoning laws. Sand, especially the inland Maui sand dunes, is a environmental and cultural resource that needs special protection. The Maui Inland Sand dunes are well-known to be the final resting place of many ʻIwi Kūpuna and must be respected
  • Follow the $$$: Big business interests want Council to look the other way because their businesses profit greatly off the mining and selling of Maui sand. For example, Maui Lani Partners has made millions from selling this sand. These business interests are doing everything they can to make sure sand is not considered an environmental resource because that would hurt their profits. Please put the communityʻs interests over those of big businesses.
  • If Council Doesnʻt Do This…: Through comments given at previous IEM meetings on this issue, its clear that State Historic Preservation Division (SHPD) officials donʻt have the ability to properly enforce their own rules and the County departments issuing these permits have ignored lies on permit applications and not enforced their own rules. If Council doesnʻt pass this moratorium, ʻIwi Kūpuna will continue to be desecrated and Maui will lose all its inland sand.
  • Hold the Guilty Accountable: Council should hold accountable all those involved in the illegal activity that led to the resource extraction and desecration of ʻIwi Kūpuna. In addition to passing this moratorium, thereʻs a long paper trail of guilt and incompetence that must be examined.

Check out the agenda and documents for the July 31st and August 14th meetings, including the text of the bill, at http://mauicounty.us/agendas/  (Make sure you search for Infrastructure and Environmental Management agendas)