Sand Mining Lawsuit: Two testify they saw work being done without a monitor

Published August 24, 2017 in The Maui News

“Sand Mining Lawsuit: Two testify they saw work being done without a monitor”

2017 Q3 Outings Schedule (June-September)

Please register for all hikes with the leader listed in the description. Please be prepared for outings: bring lunch, water, rain gear, sunscreen and appropriate footwear. Hiking boots are recommended for longer hikes. A donation of $5 ($3 for Sierra Club members) is requested of hikers over age 14. We always welcome more hike leaders. Contact Lucienne deNaie at laluz@maui.net if you are interested in becoming a hike leader.

Hike Descriptions Key:

(C) means conservation, such as discussing how to conserve this land for future generations to enjoy.
(E) means educational, such as visiting and learning about archeological sites and naming the plants and flowers.
(S) indicates a service outing.
(D) is the round trip hike distance.

Friday, June 9 Hamakuapoko Historical hike (Baldwin Beach Park)
(C/E) D=4 mi. Pleasant walk along bike path and beach to learn about the rich and hidden history of this lovely area. Bring hat/water/snacks. Meet 9:00 a.m. in Baldwin beach parking lot. Limit 15. Leader: Lucienne de Naie <laluz@maui.net> or 214-0147.

Sunday, June 11 – Makapipi Watershed Trail – REQUIRES EMI WAIVER
(C/E) D=4 mi. Varied terrain. Ditch trail: Makapipi to Kopili’ula Stream. Scenic vistas, pools, waterfalls. native plant life. Hike crosses several bridges with no hand rails, not recommended for those sensitive to heights. EMI waiver required (see below) Meet at 8:00 am at the Haiku Community Center. Limit 18. Leader: Miranda Camp <mauimiranda@hotmail.com> or 868-6848.

Sunday, June 18 – Mākena Shoreline Hike
(C/E) D=3 mi R/T. Moderate. Narrow “fisherman’s trail” in sections. Help keep public access open, enjoy beautiful views with varying shoreline. Bring a snack for the end point at Black Sand Beach. Meet 9:00 a.m. in public parking lot for Polo Beach. Limit 15. Register with leader: Rob Weltman <robw@worldspot.com> or 354-0490.

Saturday, June 24 – Mālama Hamakua Day (Ha’iku)
(C/E/S) D= 4 mi R/T. Monthly service outing to remove trash and care for cultural sites on 267 acre County coastal preserve. Bring gloves/hand tools/water/hat/lunch/ sturdy shoes. Meet 9 am at Ha’iku Community Center. Limit 15. Leader: Lucienne de Naie <laluz@maui.net> or 214-0147.

Saturday, June 24 – Palauea/Wailea 670 Cultural Sites- Northwest
(C/E) D= 2 mi R/T. Explore walls and ridgelines and mark cultural sites in northwest Wailea 670 preserve. Rugged terrain. closed shoes/boots, long pants and good balance a must. Bring water, hiking stick, cameras. Meet 3 pm at top of Kaukahi Rd in Wailea. Limit 15. Leader: Lucienne de Naie <laluz@maui.net> or 214-0147.

Sunday, June 25 – Huelo Coastal Trail to Ocean
(C/E) D= 2 mi R/T (Private land-no EMI Waiver needed) hike along steep, but scenic coastal trail to ocean in Huelo area. Meet 9:00 am at Haiku Community Center. Limit: 15. Leader: Miranda Camp <mauimiranda@hotmail.com> or 868-6848.

Saturday, July 1
Makawao Forest Reserve (C/E)
7 miles
Left side of road, 3 mile climb up trails and jeep road, moderately strenuous and muddy). Meet 8:30 am at parking lot across St. Joseph’s Church (Makawao Ave.) Limit 18. Leader: Robin West <rwest808@yahoo.com> or 277-7267.

Sunday, July 9
Hanawi (Nahiku area) stream hike (C/E)
4 miles
Strenuous. Pools waterfalls, native stream life. Numerous stream crossings. Good water footwear a must. Meet 8:30 a.m. at Haiku Community center. EMI waiver required (see above). Limit 15. Leader: Rob Weltman <robw@worldspot.com> or 354-0490.

Sunday, July 16
Palauʻea/Wailea 670 Kalama-Kanaio Road Trail (C/E)
2 miles
Hike historic Kalama-Kanaio Trail to its south limits. Magnificent mauka-makai views, native plants and hidden archaeological sites. Rugged, rocky terrain. Closed shoes/boots, long pants and good balance a must. Bring water, hiking stick, cameras. Meet 3 pm at top of Kaukahi Rd in Wailea. Limit 15. Leader: Lucienne de Naie <laluz@maui.net> or 214-0147.

Friday and Saturday, July 21 & 22
Photograph the King Tides and help us learn more about their impacts on Maui.
To participate, contact Adriane <adriane.raff-corwin@sierraclub.org > or 419-5143.

Saturday, July 22
SIERRA CLUB SPROUTS Outing (C/E/S)
Ages 7-13, teenage siblings welcome as volunteers to help with event. $5 per child, light snacks provided. Topic: Oceans. Kids will learn about rising sea levels and the impacts of plastic in our oceans through fun and educational activities. 10 am-12 pm. Location TBA. Leader: Adriane Raff Corwin <adriane.raff-corwin@sierraclub.org > or 419-5143.

Sunday, July 23
Makaʻiwa Bay and shoreline (east Maui) (C/E)
4 miles
Sometimes strenuous hike through a muddy forest and then down a ridge line to the coast. There are ropes at the end of the hike if you would like to explore the coastline. The return hike is all uphill. Bring water, snacks, sunscreen, hat, swimwear. Limit 10. Meet at Haiku Community Center 8 am to carpool. Leader: Miranda Camp <mauimiranda@hotmail.com> or 868-6848.

Saturday, July 29
Hāmākua Mālama Day (C/E/S)
Ha‘ikū, 4 miles
Monthly community service outing to remove trash and keep coastal trails open on 267 acres of Hamakua lands purchased by Maui County. Bring gloves/hand tools/water/hat/lunch/ sturdy shoes. Meet 9am at Ha‘ikū Community Center. Limit 15. Leader: Lucienne de Naie <laluz@maui.net> or 214-0147

Sunday, August 6
Lower Waikamoi Stream hike (C/E)
3 miles
Short but rugged stream hike from Waikamoi Ridge trail on Hana Hwy upstream to pool/waterfall. Native plants, scenery. Bring lunch, water, hat and water hiking footwear. Meet 8:00 am Haiku Community Center. Limit 12. EMI WAIVER REQUIRED (See above). Leader: Rob Weltman <robw@worldspot.com> or 354-0490.

Friday Aug 11
Palauʻea/Wailea 670 Native Plant Hike (C/E)
2.5 miles
Explore lava flow areas to check for rare native native plants in bloom. Rugged terrain. Closed shoes/boots, long pants and good balance a must. Bring water, hiking stick, cameras. Meet 3 pm at top of Kaukahi Rd in Wailea. Limit 15. Leader: Lucienne de Naie <laluz@maui.net> or 214-0147.

Saturday, August 19
Makamakaʻole (C/E)
2 miles
Beautiful hike with many stream crossings and waterfall at the end. Bring water shoes, lunch, water, swimsuit. Limit 12. Meet at Waihee School parking lot 8:30 am to carpool. Leader: Miranda Camp <mauimiranda@hotmail.com> or 868-6848.

Saturday, August 26
Hāmākua Mālama Day (C/E/S)
Ha‘ikū, 4 miles
Monthly community service outing to remove trash and keep coastal trails open on 267 acres of Hamakua lands purchased by Maui County. Bring gloves/hand tools/water/hat/lunch/ sturdy shoes. Meet 9am at Ha‘ikū Community Center. Limit 15. Leader: Lucienne de Naie <laluz@maui.net> or 214-0147

Sunday, August 27
Wahinepeʻe Water Hike (C/E)
9 miles
Hike historic trail to overlook Honomanu stream and Valley. Pools. Waterfalls. Great scenery. Will be muddy. EMI waiver required. Bring water, lunch, bug spray. Meet 8 am Haiku Community Center. Limit 15. Leader: Robin West <rwest808@yahoo.com> or 277-7267.

Friday Sept 1
Palauʻea/Wailea 670 Cultural Sites & Native Plants (C/E)
2.5 miles
Explore lava flow areas marking cultural sites and monitoring native plants in Central Wailea 670 preserve. Rugged terrain. Closed shoes/boots, long pants and good balance a must. Bring water, hiking stick, cameras. Meet 3 pm at top of Kaukahi Rd in Wailea. Limit 15. Leader: Lucienne de Naie <laluz@maui.net> or 214-0147.

Saturday, September 9
Sliding Sands Trail and Halemauʻu Trail (C/E)
Haleakalā, 11-12 miles
Advanced hike through the Haleakalā crater from the Keoneheʻe Trailhead at 9740 ft. to Halemauʻu at 7990 ft. Hike goes down 3000 ft. in elevation and then back up 1000 ft. Must be in great physical shape and good with elevation changes. Bring 3+ liters of water, lunch and plenty of snacks, hat, sunscreen, warm clothing, rain jacket, binoculars, and sturdy closed toe hiking shoes. Meet 8:30 am at Pukalani Longs parking lot. Hike will take about 7-8 hours. At end of hike, optional stay to watch sunset and the stars come out. Note: Fee of $20/car to enter the Haleakalā National Park. Limit 12. Leader: Adriane Raff Corwin <adriane.raff-corwin@sierraclub.org > or 419-5143. Map of hike route: https://www.nps.gov/hale/planyourvisit/upload/Map-and-Descriptions-FINAL_Compressed-1.pdf

Sunday, September 17
Wailua Iki Stream Hike (E/C)
6 miles
Moderate hike through beautiful forest on winding muddy, jeep road. Pools, waterfalls and lush plant life. Bring appropriate footwear, sunscreen, lunch and water. Meet 8:00 am at Haiku Community Center. EMI waiver required (see above). Limit: 15. Leader: Rob Weltman <robw@worldspot.com> or 354-0490.

Sunday, September 24
Waiheʻe Ridge Hike (C)
5 miles
1200 ft elevation gain. Great workout with native plants, beautiful views! Bring rain jacket, lunch, water, hat, sunscreen. Meet 8:30 am at Waihee School parking lot. Limit 12. Leader: Miranda Camp <mauimiranda@hotmail.com> or 868-6848.

Saturday, September 30
Hāmākua Mālama Day (C/E/S)
Ha‘ikū, 4 miles
Monthly community service outing to remove trash and keep coastal trails open on 267 acres of Hamakua lands purchased by Maui County. Bring gloves/hand tools/water/hat/lunch/ sturdy shoes. Meet 9am at Ha‘ikū Community Center. Limit 15. Leader: Lucienne de Naie <laluz@maui.net> or 214-0147

EMI WAIVER REQUIRED FOR CERTAIN HIKES

To go on certain hikes, you need a waiver from East Maui Irrigation Company (EMI). If the hike description notes that you need a waiver then you absolutely must get one prior to the hike. (If there is no notation that the hike requires an EMI waiver, then you don’t need to worry about this.) One waiver covers all EMI hikes for the quarter of hikes listed currently. Call in your waiver request to EMI at 579-9516 well in advance to make an appointment for when you can sign it. Then go to EMI’s Pa’ia office at 497 Baldwin Avenue to sign the waiver. You will need to call to make sure someone will be there. Waivers CANNOT be mailed, faxed or emailed. Sierra Club Maui does not make the rules. EMI does. Please be considerate of EMI staff time and pick up waiver 5 days in advance whenever possible. THE WAIVER MUST BE BROUGHT ON THE HIKE AND SHOWN TO THE HIKE LEADER. Mahalo

Testify Against Sand Mining at the IEM

On Monday, August 14th at 1:30 PM the County Council’s Infrastructure & Environmental Management (IEM) Committee will meet to discuss and possibly vote to pass a sand mining moratorium bill out of committee. The meeting was postponed from July 31st because they didn’t have quorum.

Stand up for ʻiwi kūpuna and our environment – come testify in support of the moratorium (County Council Chambers – 8th Floor, 200 S. High St., Wailuku) or send your testimony to iem.committee@mauicounty.us

Talking Points You Can Use In Your Testimony

  • Protect the Culture and Environment: Mauiʻs sand is NOT a “land resource,” which is something to be bought and sold and is governed under zoning laws. Sand, especially the inland Maui sand dunes, is a environmental and cultural resource that needs special protection. The Maui Inland Sand dunes are well-known to be the final resting place of many ʻIwi Kūpuna and must be respected
  • Follow the $$$: Big business interests want Council to look the other way because their businesses profit greatly off the mining and selling of Maui sand. For example, Maui Lani Partners has made millions from selling this sand. These business interests are doing everything they can to make sure sand is not considered an environmental resource because that would hurt their profits. Please put the communityʻs interests over those of big businesses.
  • If Council Doesnʻt Do This…: Through comments given at previous IEM meetings on this issue, its clear that State Historic Preservation Division (SHPD) officials donʻt have the ability to properly enforce their own rules and the County departments issuing these permits have ignored lies on permit applications and not enforced their own rules. If Council doesnʻt pass this moratorium, ʻIwi Kūpuna will continue to be desecrated and Maui will lose all its inland sand.
  • Hold the Guilty Accountable: Council should hold accountable all those involved in the illegal activity that led to the resource extraction and desecration of ʻIwi Kūpuna. In addition to passing this moratorium, thereʻs a long paper trail of guilt and incompetence that must be examined.

Check out the agenda and documents for the July 31st and August 14th meetings, including the text of the bill, at http://mauicounty.us/agendas/  (Make sure you search for Infrastructure and Environmental Management agendas)

Press Release: Settlement Announced Over Future of Mākena Region

July 11, 2017

JOINT PRESS RELEASE

Maui Community Groups Reach Settlement Over Future of Mākena Region

Impacts of Luxury Development on Environment and Cultural Practices Significantly Reduced

Community groups and the owner of Makena Resort (ATC Makena) have reached an agreement regarding the future of the Mākena region. The agreement includes reducing density throughout the entire Mākena resort lands as well as the makai parcels, preservation of on-street public beach parking around Makena Landing, affordable housing within the Mākena area, protection of cultural sites and historic mauka-makai trails, an independent cultural manager and the establishment and perpetual funding of a community benefit fund, among other provisions.

“This settlement is a win-win because it protects the environment and cultural sites of Mākena, but also supports the needs of Maui’s local families,” said Adriane Raff Corwin, Coordinator of Sierra Club Maui Group. “Our negotiations will result in at least 60 units of housing, affordable in perpetuity and priced at or below median income levels, being built on Makena resort land. We have asked that first priority for these homes be given to families with historical ties to the Mākena area, giving kamaʻaina a chance to return to the land.”

Hoʻoponopono O Mākena, Sierra Club of Hawaii – Maui Group, and Maui Tomorrow Foundation filed suit in the Environmental Court in early May challenging the Maui Planning Commission’s Finding of No Significant Impact for ATC Makena’s 47-acre project surrounding Makena Landing. The groups were represented by attorney Lance D. Collins. A request to stay county proceedings was granted by Environmental Court Judge Joseph E. Cardoza. Shortly thereafter, the judge asked that parties begin meeting to attempt to negotiate a resolution of the community’s concerns. The lengthy, intensive negotiations were aided by both Circuit Court Judge Peter T. Cahill and retired Circuit Court Judge Shackley Raffetto.

“We need the Mākena Landing area to be a place where local families feel welcome,” said Ashford DeLima, a member of a long time Mākena family, and President of Hoʻoponopono O Mākena. “This agreement protects our past, like our cultural sites and historic trails, while it provides for the future by expanding the shoreline park and parking. We worked hard to have a guarantee that cultural access and cultural education will not be confined to a few little sites on this property. Working through an onsite cultural manager, cultural use will be a real part of the land. Our goal is for local families to learn from this land for generations to come.”

“The `āina of Mākena needed a voice,” said Albert Perez, Executive Director of Maui Tomorrow Foundation. “Maui’s people were being pushed out, but the community stepped up to the plate and pushed back. We have been working constantly over the last two months to represent the public’s interests and preserve what is best about Mākena. Our history of fighting for this special place goes back almost 40 years. The first success of this effort was the creation of Mākena State Park at Oneloa (Big Beach). Now the future of Mākena, which has been unclear for decades, has a measure of certainty. As a community, we will need to remain vigilant, but this is a start.”


Hoʻoponopono O Mākena is an organization that was formed to preserve and protect cultural and historic sites in Mākena, including heiau, rock structures, shrines, ancient walls, pathways, and roads. The group’s mission is “to make things right” in Mākena; they are interested in caring for the many historic sites in Mākena with any other interested community members.

The Maui Tomorrow Foundation is an environmental advocacy organization serving as a watchdog for enforcement of Hawaii’s environmental and land use laws. For more information, please visit maui-tomorrow.org.

The Sierra Club Maui Group, part of the Sierra Club of Hawai’i, is one of the oldest and most effective grassroots environmental organizations in the islands. Founded in 1976, we currently have thousands of members and supporters volunteering to help people better explore, enjoy, and protect Hawaiʻi’s unique environment and wildlife.

Breaking News: Sierra Club Maui & Allies File Lawsuit to Protect Makena

Breaking News!

Sierra Club Maui & Allies File Lawsuit to Protect Makena

Sierra Club Maui Group, Maui Tomorrow Foundation, and Ho’oponopono O Makena filed a lawsuit on May 2, 2017 asking the Maui Environmental Court to halt the approval of Makena Resort’s Environmental Assessment. We are extremely worried about the environmental and cultural impacts that Makena Resort’s current proposal would have on the area and are doing everything we can to ensure a proper review be completed in the form of an Environmental Impact Statement.

Through our lawsuit, we are seeking to invalidate the Maui Planning Commission’s acceptance of the Final Environmental Assessment (FEA) and issuance of a Finding of No Significant Impact for development of the proposed 47-acre M?kena Resort M-5/M-6/S-7/B-2 project, a 158-unit gated luxury community on the mauka side of Makena-Keone’o’io Road, above Makena Landing. The FEA was approved by a 5-3 vote, with several members of the Commission expressing strong reservations regarding unresolved impacts. Read our full press release here.

 

Please support Sierra Club Maui fight the good fight by making a tax-deductible donation to support our legal fees.

You can write a check to “Sierra Club Foundation” with “Maui Group” in the memo line and mail it to: P.O. Box 791180, Pa’ia, HI, 96779 or email us to find out how to donate by credit card.

We also need non-tax deductible donations that enable Sierra Club Maui Group to do the important political work that keeps Maui?s environment protected. Click here to donate to our general operating fund.

 

Mahalo for your support, and stay tuned for updates!

2017 Hawai’i State Legislature Round Up

 

Well, it’s May 5th, which means the Hawai’i State Legislature is in recess until January 2018 (they can and may be called into special session later this year, most likely to pass a funding bill for Honolulu Rail).

Unfortunately the list of good environmental bills that made it into law is short – from pesticides to clean energy, some of our state legislators took a pass on making our environmental future brighter. Our friends who work on affordable housing and other important social issues also saw very little helpful legislation passed.

But on the bright side – we were successful at beating back many bad bills. House Bill 1536 was killed and House Bill 1469 was recommitted to next year’s session, in no small part because of Sierra Club of Hawai’i’s Executive Director Marti Townsend.

There was also some great creative activism around HB1580, a cutting edge bill that set a goal of 100% clean ground transportation by 2045 – #Bananasfor1580. Although HB1580 was eventually killed, it spurred many new and young activists to participate, and we’re excited to see what’s in store for 2018! Learn more about #Bananasfor1580.

Sierra Club Maui Group wants to extend a huge mahalo to all Sierra Club of Hawai’i Chapter Staff and allies in Honolulu who worked tirelessly to pass the good bills and beat back the bad ones!

If you want to get involved more with helping pass good bills in the next legislative session, sign up for Sierra Club of Hawai’i’s Capitol Watch Action Network.