Ideas for Solo Hiking – Waihe‘e Ridge Trail

In April/May 2020 we are required to keep a distance from people outside of our own household to slow the spread of the coronavirus COVID-19 and to allow our health and other services to take care of those who need help. Sierra Club has therefor canceled all organized outings until further notice. But we are still allowed to venture out on our own or with members of our own household for exercise such as walking, running, hiking, swimming and surfing. No need to stay cooped up at home all day. Just keep at least six feet between yourself and anyone you meet. This is the fifth of several posts on good places to go hiking/walking without a guide.


The first four installments of this series covered only trails with limited elevation change. The two most popular Maui trails in the State Nā Ala Hele system provide an uphill challenge along with some extraordinary views: the Lāhaina Pali Trail and the Waihe‘e Ridge Trail. This article is about the latter of the two.

The 0.9 mile Maluhia road up to the trail head starts immediately opposite (mauka) of the Mendes Ranch on Kahekili Highway. The road ends at a parking lot with space for about 25 cars. It is often almost full. There is overflow parking at the turnoff from Kahekili Highway.

To the top of the trail and back is about 4 miles, with an elevation gain of 1,650 feet.

The first segment of the trail is a straight, steep walk up concrete, but after that it is all forest and dirt trail. Extensive repairs and improvements were completed a couple of years ago, making it less likely you’ll slip and slide. The trail is very easy to follow and you will meet families, people walking dogs and also runners.

Most of the forest is non-native but there are native ‘ōhi‘a, ‘ōlapa, uluhe and ‘ie‘ie to be seen. The Mauna Kahalawai Watershed Partnership has been planting more native plants. There are brushes at the trailhead to clean your boots before and after hiking so you don’t risk spreading Rapid ‘Ōhi‘a Death or invasive species.

There are very impressive views at about the half-way point looking down to the valley and along the coast past Kahului. If you are lucky, you will have even more striking views from the top, but often that level is shrouded by clouds. Early morning is the most likely time to beat the clouds. On the way up you will see at least one waterfall.

Here is a map: https://bit.ly/waihee-ridge. The Kukuipuka Heiau is just below the trail head (leave your car in the trail head parking and walk down the road a short ways to the gate on the right).

Ideas for Solo Hiking – Upcountry

In April/May 2020 we are required to keep a distance from people outside of our own household to slow the spread of the coronavirus COVID-19 and to allow our health and other services to take care of those who need help. Sierra Club has therefor canceled all organized outings until further notice. But we are still allowed to venture out on our own or with members of our own household for exercise such as walking, running, hiking, swimming and surfing. No need to stay cooped up at home all day. Just keep at least six feet between yourself and anyone you meet. This is the fourth of several posts on good places to go hiking/walking without a guide.


The Makawao Forest Reserve hosts one of the more popular trails on Maui. It is easy to get to Upcountry, and a very pleasant destination for those seeking refuge from sun and heat near the coast because it is all shady. The Makawao Forest Reserve is an example of successful reforestation using non-native trees – mostly tropical ash, eucalyptus and cook pine. In today’s world the choice might have been native Hawaiian trees, but many of the benefits of reforestation have been accomplished. You will see indigenous ti plants and you may see indigenous maile and halapepe on your hike.

The Kahakapao Loop is just under five miles round-trip. It is well-marked and easy to follow as you can see in the pictures, with a gentle elevation gain of 1,165 feet. If the parking is full (at the end of Kahakapao Road), there is another parking lot accessible from the first parking lot, with a sign for horse trailers. The trail is shared with bike riders heading up-hill (they have dedicated trails for going down-hill). Here is a map:

https://bit.ly/kahakapao

Unfortunately there are many invasive plant species in the forest, including banana poka, strawberry guava and himalayan ginger. While they may be pretty to look at, they choke out native plants.


 

 

 

 

Ideas for Solo Hiking – Near Central Maui

In April 2020 we are required to keep a distance from people outside of our own household to slow the spread of the coronavirus COVID-19 and to allow our health and other services to take care of those who need help. Sierra Club has therefor canceled all organized outings until further notice. But we are still allowed to venture out on our own or with members of our own household for exercise such as walking, running, hiking, swimming and surfing. No need to stay cooped up at home all day. Just keep at least six feet between yourself and anyone you meet. This is the third of several posts on good places to go hiking/walking without a guide.


The Waihe‘e Coastal Dunes & Wetlands Refuge is a wonderful place to hike and explore, easy to get to from Central Maui. If it wasn’t for the current “social distancing” restrictions, it would be an excellent place for a picnic and spending the day as well. The refuge is open to the public.

Here is some information from the Hawaian Islands Land Trust (HILT), the custodians of the refuge:

Once slated for development as a golf course, the Waihe’e Coastal Dunes and Wetlands Refuge protects over 24 acres of coastal, spring-fed wetland, 103 acres of dune ecosystem, over 7000 feet of marine shoreline and more than 8 acres of riparian habitat for the recovery of native birds and native vegetation. The Land Trust took fee ownership of this very sensitive 277-acre site in 2004. Active restoration programs have enhanced critical native wildlife habitat, while preserving the area’s rich archaeological and cultural resources. Once populated with two thriving ancient Hawaiian villages, an extensive inland fishpond and several heiau (Hawaiian temples), the Waihee Refuge is among the most significant cultural sites in the state.

The Hawaiian Island Land Trust (HILT) aims to restore the Waihe’e Refuge to reflect the cultural and natural state it would have been in 200 years ago. This vision requires a lot of labor intensive work; when HILT (formerly Maui Coastal Land Trust) acquired the Waihe’e Refuge, roughly 95% of the plants found on the site were considered to be invasive species.

Restoring the Waihe’e Refuge to its historical, natural state will encourage native plants to take hold of the site again, thereby enhancing the natural resilience of the system. A healthy, more resilient landscape could buffer the impacts of climate change better than a damaged landscape could. The wetland is now up to 70% native species and native plants and birds have begun to naturally repopulate the surrounding landscape.

In testament to the returning health of the ecosystem, eight different endangered species have taken up residence at the Refuge in recent years. With the wetlands primarily cleared and habitat-appropriate plants now thriving, the area is host to many native Hawaiian bird species, including ae‘o (stilt), alae ke‘oke‘o (coot), koloa (duck), and even nene (goose).
Quiet and pristine, the Waihe‘e shoreline is a favorite retreat for endangered Hawaiian monk seals and nesting green sea turtles. Off the coast, the extensive reef is one of the longest and widest on Maui. It’s believed that this reef system provided excellent fishing in ancient times and it is, in fact, still a favorite among local fishermen today.

Parking for the refuge is either on the grass next to the refuge entrance or in the beach parking lot next to it. To get there, take Halewalu Road from Kahekili Highway. Halewalu Road leads to the Waiehu Golf Course and there are signs at the turnoff for both the golf course and the refuge. After 0.4 miles the turnoff from Halewalu Road to the refuge is on the left side. There is a sign. The road ends after 0.2 miles with the refuge entrance on the left and beach parking on the right.

This map shows a hike of 2.6 miles round-trip on level ground:

https://bit.ly/waihee-dunes

After entering the refuge, after 1,000 feet you will arrive at a fork in the trail. The old dairy is on the right and there is a map and interesting information about the refuge to read here. You can continue straight at this point, parallel to and close to the ocean, or you can take a detour off to the left as in the map. The detour takes you past areas where volunteers have been working on planting native Hawaiian plants and then rejoins the coastal trail. Either way, you will continue along the coastline until you reach the mouth of the Waihe‘e River. That is the turning point.

Coming back along the coastal trail, you can opt to walk for a stretch on the round rocks on the beach before continuing on the trail back to the parking area.

There has been very little trash the last few times I have been there, but please bring a bag just in case. The area most likely to have washed up plastic debris is the last beach before getting back to the parking area.

Ideas for solo hiking – West Maui

In April 2020 we are required to keep a distance from people outside of our own household to slow the spread of the coronavirus COVID-19 and to allow our health and other services to take care of those who need help. Sierra Club has therefor canceled all organized outings until further notice. But we are still allowed to venture out on our own or with members of our own household for exercise such as walking, running, hiking, swimming and surfing. No need to stay cooped up at home all day. Just keep at least six feet between yourself and anyone you meet. This is the second of several posts on good places to go hiking/walking without a guide.

The Kapalua Coastal Trail is an easy walk on the West Side with breath-taking views.

For a minimal 2-mile walk, park at Kapalua Parking at the intersection of Kapalua Place and Lower Honoapiilani Highway, cross Kapalua Place and follow the trail down to and along the ocean. Note the detour (see the map) out to a point at about 1/2 mile into the walk.

Note: as of May 12 at least, the path from DT Fleming Park to Makalua Point is closed off due to the coronavirus pandemic, so for this hike don’t park at DT Fleming. But you can park near the corner of Office Road and Lower Honoapili Road. That lets you do the Makaluapuna Point detour as well.

Update July 11: The restrooms at DT Fleming Park and the one at the other end of the hike at Kapalua Bay are now open.

For a longer outing, park at DT Fleming Park instead and head up the concrete path until you reach Kapalua Place and the trailhead described above. On the way there, take a detour on the lawn to the right where there is a fence and a monument informing about the historic events at Honokahua. In 1987 development of the Ritz Karlton started and uncovered the bones of hundreds of Hawaiians. There were massive protests on Maui and in Honolulu, leading to the moving of the Ritz Karlton away from the site, the preservation of the burial area and in 1990 to the Burial Treatment Law that gives traditional Hawaiian burials the same protections as those for Christian cemeteries.

On the way back from this longer outing, follow the Honokahua fence out to Makaluapuna Point for a detour to see some unusual lava stone formations forming a toothed wall against the crashing waves.

Here is a map:
https://bit.ly/kapalua-coastal

Ideas for solo hiking – South Maui

In April 2020 we are required to keep a distance from people outside of our own household to slow the spread of the coronavirus COVID-19 and to allow our health and other services to take care of those who need help. Sierra Club has therefor canceled all organized outings until further notice. But we are still allowed to venture out on our own or with members of our own household for exercise such as walking, running, hiking, swimming and surfing. No need to stay cooped up at home all day. Just keep at least six feet between yourself and anyone you meet. This is the first of several posts on good places to go hiking/walking without a guide.

South Maui is blessed with miles of easily accessible coastline that even novice hikers can enjoy. You can walk from beach to beach with only short detours on low grassy bluffs all the way from Kalama Park to Ulua Beach, over 3 miles. This stretch includes beautiful views out over low rocky cliffs as well as eight sandy beaches. Stay as close as you can to the water to keep on this trail. When you get to the South end of Ulua Beach you can walk up to the paved Wailea Beach Walk and continue for another mile to Polo Beach. No need to do the whole trail – you can generally get to it from South Kihei Road or Wailea Alanui Drive from one or both ends of any of the ten beaches it passes. Here is an approximate map of the 4+ mile (one-way) path described:

bit.ly/south-maui-walk

 

2017 Q4 Hike Schedule

Friday Sept 1
Palauʻea/Wailea 670 Cultural Sites & Native Plants (C/E)
2.5 miles
Explore lava flow areas marking cultural sites and monitoring native plants in Central Wailea 670 preserve. Rugged terrain. Closed shoes/boots, long pants and good balance a must. Bring water, hiking stick, cameras. Meet 3 pm at top of Kaukahi Rd in Wailea. Limit 15. Leader: Lucienne de Naie <laluz@maui.net> or 214-0147.

Saturday, September 9
Sliding Sands Trail and Halemauʻu Trail (C/E)
Haleakalā, 11-12 miles
Advanced hike through the Haleakalā crater from the Keoneheʻe Trailhead at 9740 ft. to Halemauʻu at 7990 ft. Hike goes down 3000 ft. in elevation and then back up 1000 ft. Must be in great physical shape and good with elevation changes. Bring 3+ liters of water, lunch and plenty of snacks, hat, sunscreen, warm clothing, rain jacket, binoculars, and sturdy closed toe hiking shoes. Meet 8:30 am at Pukalani Longs parking lot. Hike will take about 7-8 hours. At end of hike, optional stay to watch sunset and the stars come out. Note: Fee of $20/car to enter the Haleakalā National Park. Limit 12. Leader: Robin West <rwest808@yahoo.com> or 277-7267. Map of hike route: https://www.nps.gov/hale/planyourvisit/upload/Map-and-Descriptions-FINAL_Compressed-1.pdf

Sunday, September 17
Wailua Iki Stream Hike (E/C)
6 miles
Moderate hike through beautiful forest on winding muddy, jeep road. Pools, waterfalls and lush plant life. Bring appropriate footwear, sunscreen, lunch and water. Meet 8:00 am at Haiku Community Center. EMI waiver required (see above). Limit: 15. Leader: Rob Weltman <robw@worldspot.com> or 354-0490.

Sunday, September 24
Waiheʻe Ridge Hike (C)
5 miles
1200 ft elevation gain. Great workout with native plants, beautiful views! Bring rain jacket, lunch, water, hat, sunscreen. Meet 8:30 am at Waihee School parking lot. Limit 12.  Leader: Miranda Camp <mauimiranda@hotmail.com> or 868-6848.

Saturday, September 30
Hāmākua Mālama Day (C/E/S)
Ha‘ikū, 4 miles
Monthly community service outing to remove trash and keep coastal trails open on 267 acres of Hamakua lands purchased by Maui County. Bring gloves/hand tools/water/hat/lunch/ sturdy shoes. Meet 9am at Ha‘ikū Community Center. Limit 15. Leader: Lucienne de Naie <laluz@maui.net> or 214-0147

Saturday, October 7
Waikamoi Preserve Native Bird Outing (E/C)
1.25 miles
Moderate. Wonderful guided hike into a Native Hawaiian Forest. It’s a unique and special ecosystem and a great birding hike. Meet 8 a.m. Hosmer’s Grove inside Haleakala National Park. There is a $10 per car entrance fee to the park. Bring water, lunch/snack. Be prepared for chilly and/or wet weather. Limit 15. Special conditions for this outing: to prevent spread of rapid ohiʻa death, no participants may have been on the Big Island for the past three months; no participants under 18 years; please make sure your shoes and pack are clean. Leader: Rob Weltman <robw@worldspot.com> or 808-354-0490.

Sunday, October 8
Olowalu Stream Hike (C/E) Canceled

Sunday, October 8
Makawao Forest Reserve – Kahakapao Loop
(E)
Moderate hike hike through 6 miles of big tree forest, shaded all the way and mostly level. Meet in the parking lot across from St. Joseph’s Church on Makawao Ave at 9 am. At a leisurely pace it’s a 3 hour hike. Limit 18. Leader Kalei Johnson <kalei1908@gmail.com> or 344-0006; leave your phone number.

Sunday, October 15
Wailea 670/Palau’ea (C/E)
South Maui 2 miles
Newly restored loop trail across lava flows, to a cluster of cultural sites in Southeast Wailea 670 preserve. Rugged terrain. Closed shoes/boots, long pants and good balance a must. Bring water, hiking stick, cameras. Meet 4 pm at top of Kaukahi Rd in Wailea. Limit 15. Leader: Lucienne de Naie <laluz@maui.net> or 214-0147.

Special Event
Friday, October 20
Nā Hoku – Star Watch at Waikapū Tropical Plantation slopes (C/E)
Come spend an evening with astronomer Harriet Witt and learn about the lore of our Hawaiian night sky. Bring comfortable folding chair and flashlight.
Meet at 6 pm in the main parking lot, in front of the country store.
$5 for members, $10 non-members. Register with Adriane Raff Corwin <adriane.raff-corwin@sierraclub.org> or 419-5143

Sunday, October 22
‘Iao Valley (C/E)
3 miles
Hike this beautiful stream trail in I’ao Valley where we will pass by a small taro lo’i and a few pristine swimming holes. Come prepared for possible wet/muddy trails and bring swim gear. Meet 9:30 am at Heritage Park parking lot. Limit 15. Leader: Kalei Johnson <kalei1908@gmail.com> or 344-0006 and leave your phone number for registration.

Saturday, October 28
Hāmākua Mālama Day (C/E/S)
Ha‘ikū, 4 miles
Monthly community service outing to remove trash and keep coastal trails open on 267 acres of Hamakua lands purchased by Maui County. Bring gloves/hand tools/water/hat/lunch/ sturdy shoes. Meet 9am at Ha‘ikū Community Center. Limit 15. Leader: Lucienne de Naie <laluz@maui.net> or 214-0147

Saturday, November 4
Kōkua Day at Fleming Arboretum, Pu’u Mahoe (C/E)
Help maintain the Fleming Arboretum at 2600 feet in Ulupalakua, sanctuary to many endangered native dry land forest plants. Awesome views of La Perouse (Keone’o’io) coast and Kahoolawe. Bring a light jacket, lunch, and gloves. Meet 9am Keokea Park. Estimate 3 hours of work. Refreshments available. A BYO lunch will be at the Fleming cabin with a great view of South Maui. Limit 20. Leader: Rob Weltman <robw@worldspot.com> or 354-0490

Saturday, November 11
Makamakaʻole (C/E)
2 miles
Beautiful hike with many stream crossings and waterfall at the end. Bring water shoes, lunch, water, swimsuit. Limit 12. Meet at Waiehu Golf Club parking lot 8:30 am to carpool. Leader: Miranda Camp <mauimiranda@hotmail.com> or 868-6848. Email is preferred.

Friday, November 17
Wailea 670/Palau’ea (C/E)
South Maui 2.5 miles
Makahiki hike. Visit several ceremonial sites in Wailea 670 preserve to pay our respects. Rugged terrain. Closed shoes/boots, long pants and good balance a must. Bring water, hiking stick, cameras. Meet 4 pm at top of Kaukahi Rd in Wailea. Limit 15. Leader: Lucienne de Naie <laluz@maui.net> or 214-0147.

Sunday, November 19
King’s Highway (Hoapili Trail) to Kanaio Beach (C/E)
Mākena, 6 miles
Kings Highway from La Perouse Bay to south of major lava flow and great snorkel place. Bring lunch, water, hat and sunscreen. Bring bathing suit and snorkel gear if you want to snorkel. Meet at Kihei Community Center at 8:30 am. Leader: Rob Weltman <robw@worldspot.com> or 354-0490

Saturday, November 25
Hāmākua Mālama Day (C/E/S)
Ha‘ikū, 4 miles
Monthly community service outing to remove trash and keep coastal trails open on 267 acres of Hamakua lands purchased by Maui County. Bring gloves/hand tools/water/hat/lunch/ sturdy shoes. Meet 9am at Ha‘ikū Community Center. Limit 15. Leader: Lucienne de Naie <laluz@maui.net> or 214-0147 

Saturday, December 2
Makawao Forest Reserve – Kahakapao Loop (E)
7 miles
Moderate to strenuous hike of big tree forest on undulating trail, estimated time at least 3 hours. Meet in the parking lot across from St. Joseph’s Church on Makawao Ave at 9 am. Limit 18. Leader: Kalei Johnson <kalei1908@gmail.com> or 344-0006; leave your phone number.

Sunday, December 3
Launiupoko Heiau and Valley C/E)
4 miles
Lots of trails/Hawaiian heiau and sites hidden along the way as we hike up this iconic valley. Bring hat, sunscreen, water, lunch/snack. Meet 8 am at Maui Ocean Center parking lot in Ma’alaea, near gas station. Limit 20. Leader: Miranda Camp <mauimiranda@hotmail.com> or 868-6848. Email preferred. 

Saturday, December 9
Old Makena-Ulupalakua Road Hike (C/E)
Mākena, 6 miles mostly downhill
Rare opportunity. Experience this famous historic road that has been closed for all use since 1985. Downhill on switchback road (leave cars at both ends.) Bring hat, sunscreen, water, lunch/snack. Estimated time: 3 hours. Meet 8 am at Makena Landing parking lot. Limit 20.   Leader: Lucienne de Naie <laluz@maui.net> or 214-0147

Sunday, December 10
Kapalua Resort Coastal Trail hike (C/E)
3.5 miles, mostly level
Hike spectacular Kapalua Resort Coastal Trail with optional snorkel at Kapalua Bay. Meet 8:30 am at the Maui Ocean Center parking lot in Maalaea (the end near the gas station) to carpool. If you live on the West side, meet 9:30 am at D. T. Fleming Beach Park (the South parking lot) which is where the trail starts. Bring water, lunch, sun protection, camera, and optionally a swimsuit and snorkel gear. Limit 18. Leader: Rob Weltman <robw@worldspot.com> or 354-0490

Saturday, December 16
Wailea 670/Palau’ea (C/E)
South Maui 2 miles
Archaeological hike with Dr. Janet Six. Visit prominent cultural complexes in Wailea 670 preserve to mark sites. Rugged terrain. Closed shoes/boots, long pants and good balance a must. Bring water, hiking stick, cameras. Meet 3 pm at top of Kaukahi Rd in Wailea. Limit 15. Leader:s Lucienne de Naie and Janet Six. Register: <laluz@maui.net> or 214-0147.

Saturday, December 30
Hāmākua Mālama Day (C/E/S)
Ha‘ikū, 4 miles
Monthly community service outing to remove trash and keep coastal trails open on 267 acres of Hamakua lands purchased by Maui County. Bring gloves/hand tools/water/hat/lunch/ sturdy shoes. Meet 9am at Ha‘ikū Community Center. Limit 15. Leader: Lucienne de Naie <laluz@maui.net> or 214-0147

2017 Q3 Outings Schedule (June-September)

Please register for all hikes with the leader listed in the description. Please be prepared for outings: bring lunch, water, rain gear, sunscreen and appropriate footwear. Hiking boots are recommended for longer hikes. A donation of $5 ($3 for Sierra Club members) is requested of hikers over age 14. We always welcome more hike leaders. Contact Lucienne deNaie at laluz@maui.net if you are interested in becoming a hike leader.

Hike Descriptions Key:

(C) means conservation, such as discussing how to conserve this land for future generations to enjoy.
(E) means educational, such as visiting and learning about archeological sites and naming the plants and flowers.
(S) indicates a service outing.
(D) is the round trip hike distance.

Friday, June 9 Hamakuapoko Historical hike (Baldwin Beach Park)
(C/E) D=4 mi. Pleasant walk along bike path and beach to learn about the rich and hidden history of this lovely area. Bring hat/water/snacks. Meet 9:00 a.m. in Baldwin beach parking lot. Limit 15. Leader: Lucienne de Naie <laluz@maui.net> or 214-0147.

Sunday, June 11 – Makapipi Watershed Trail – REQUIRES EMI WAIVER
(C/E) D=4 mi. Varied terrain. Ditch trail: Makapipi to Kopili’ula Stream. Scenic vistas, pools, waterfalls. native plant life. Hike crosses several bridges with no hand rails, not recommended for those sensitive to heights. EMI waiver required (see below) Meet at 8:00 am at the Haiku Community Center. Limit 18. Leader: Miranda Camp <mauimiranda@hotmail.com> or 868-6848.

Sunday, June 18 – Mākena Shoreline Hike
(C/E) D=3 mi R/T. Moderate. Narrow “fisherman’s trail” in sections. Help keep public access open, enjoy beautiful views with varying shoreline. Bring a snack for the end point at Black Sand Beach. Meet 9:00 a.m. in public parking lot for Polo Beach. Limit 15. Register with leader: Rob Weltman <robw@worldspot.com> or 354-0490.

Saturday, June 24 – Mālama Hamakua Day (Ha’iku)
(C/E/S) D= 4 mi R/T. Monthly service outing to remove trash and care for cultural sites on 267 acre County coastal preserve. Bring gloves/hand tools/water/hat/lunch/ sturdy shoes. Meet 9 am at Ha’iku Community Center. Limit 15. Leader: Lucienne de Naie <laluz@maui.net> or 214-0147.

Saturday, June 24 – Palauea/Wailea 670 Cultural Sites- Northwest
(C/E) D= 2 mi R/T. Explore walls and ridgelines and mark cultural sites in northwest Wailea 670 preserve. Rugged terrain. closed shoes/boots, long pants and good balance a must. Bring water, hiking stick, cameras. Meet 3 pm at top of Kaukahi Rd in Wailea. Limit 15. Leader: Lucienne de Naie <laluz@maui.net> or 214-0147.

Sunday, June 25 – Huelo Coastal Trail to Ocean
(C/E) D= 2 mi R/T (Private land-no EMI Waiver needed) hike along steep, but scenic coastal trail to ocean in Huelo area. Meet 9:00 am at Haiku Community Center. Limit: 15. Leader: Miranda Camp <mauimiranda@hotmail.com> or 868-6848.

Saturday, July 1
Makawao Forest Reserve (C/E)
7 miles
Left side of road, 3 mile climb up trails and jeep road, moderately strenuous and muddy). Meet 8:30 am at parking lot across St. Joseph’s Church (Makawao Ave.) Limit 18. Leader: Robin West <rwest808@yahoo.com> or 277-7267.

Sunday, July 9
Hanawi (Nahiku area) stream hike (C/E)
4 miles
Strenuous. Pools waterfalls, native stream life. Numerous stream crossings. Good water footwear a must. Meet 8:30 a.m. at Haiku Community center. EMI waiver required (see above). Limit 15. Leader: Rob Weltman <robw@worldspot.com> or 354-0490.

Sunday, July 16
Palauʻea/Wailea 670 Kalama-Kanaio Road Trail (C/E)
2 miles
Hike historic Kalama-Kanaio Trail to its south limits. Magnificent mauka-makai views, native plants and hidden archaeological sites. Rugged, rocky terrain. Closed shoes/boots, long pants and good balance a must. Bring water, hiking stick, cameras. Meet 3 pm at top of Kaukahi Rd in Wailea. Limit 15. Leader: Lucienne de Naie <laluz@maui.net> or 214-0147.

Friday and Saturday, July 21 & 22
Photograph the King Tides and help us learn more about their impacts on Maui.
To participate, contact Adriane <adriane.raff-corwin@sierraclub.org > or 419-5143.

Saturday, July 22
SIERRA CLUB SPROUTS Outing (C/E/S)
Ages 7-13, teenage siblings welcome as volunteers to help with event. $5 per child, light snacks provided. Topic: Oceans. Kids will learn about rising sea levels and the impacts of plastic in our oceans through fun and educational activities. 10 am-12 pm. Location TBA. Leader: Adriane Raff Corwin <adriane.raff-corwin@sierraclub.org > or 419-5143.

Sunday, July 23
Makaʻiwa Bay and shoreline (east Maui) (C/E)
4 miles
Sometimes strenuous hike through a muddy forest and then down a ridge line to the coast. There are ropes at the end of the hike if you would like to explore the coastline. The return hike is all uphill. Bring water, snacks, sunscreen, hat, swimwear. Limit 10. Meet at Haiku Community Center 8 am to carpool. Leader: Miranda Camp <mauimiranda@hotmail.com> or 868-6848.

Saturday, July 29
Hāmākua Mālama Day (C/E/S)
Ha‘ikū, 4 miles
Monthly community service outing to remove trash and keep coastal trails open on 267 acres of Hamakua lands purchased by Maui County. Bring gloves/hand tools/water/hat/lunch/ sturdy shoes. Meet 9am at Ha‘ikū Community Center. Limit 15. Leader: Lucienne de Naie <laluz@maui.net> or 214-0147

Sunday, August 6
Lower Waikamoi Stream hike (C/E)
3 miles
Short but rugged stream hike from Waikamoi Ridge trail on Hana Hwy upstream to pool/waterfall. Native plants, scenery. Bring lunch, water, hat and water hiking footwear. Meet 8:00 am Haiku Community Center. Limit 12. EMI WAIVER REQUIRED (See above). Leader: Rob Weltman <robw@worldspot.com> or 354-0490.

Friday Aug 11
Palauʻea/Wailea 670 Native Plant Hike (C/E)
2.5 miles
Explore lava flow areas to check for rare native native plants in bloom. Rugged terrain. Closed shoes/boots, long pants and good balance a must. Bring water, hiking stick, cameras. Meet 3 pm at top of Kaukahi Rd in Wailea. Limit 15. Leader: Lucienne de Naie <laluz@maui.net> or 214-0147.

Saturday, August 19
Makamakaʻole (C/E)
2 miles
Beautiful hike with many stream crossings and waterfall at the end. Bring water shoes, lunch, water, swimsuit. Limit 12. Meet at Waihee School parking lot 8:30 am to carpool. Leader: Miranda Camp <mauimiranda@hotmail.com> or 868-6848.

Saturday, August 26
Hāmākua Mālama Day (C/E/S)
Ha‘ikū, 4 miles
Monthly community service outing to remove trash and keep coastal trails open on 267 acres of Hamakua lands purchased by Maui County. Bring gloves/hand tools/water/hat/lunch/ sturdy shoes. Meet 9am at Ha‘ikū Community Center. Limit 15. Leader: Lucienne de Naie <laluz@maui.net> or 214-0147

Sunday, August 27
Wahinepeʻe Water Hike (C/E)
9 miles
Hike historic trail to overlook Honomanu stream and Valley. Pools. Waterfalls. Great scenery. Will be muddy. EMI waiver required. Bring water, lunch, bug spray. Meet 8 am Haiku Community Center. Limit 15. Leader: Robin West <rwest808@yahoo.com> or 277-7267.

Friday Sept 1
Palauʻea/Wailea 670 Cultural Sites & Native Plants (C/E)
2.5 miles
Explore lava flow areas marking cultural sites and monitoring native plants in Central Wailea 670 preserve. Rugged terrain. Closed shoes/boots, long pants and good balance a must. Bring water, hiking stick, cameras. Meet 3 pm at top of Kaukahi Rd in Wailea. Limit 15. Leader: Lucienne de Naie <laluz@maui.net> or 214-0147.

Saturday, September 9
Sliding Sands Trail and Halemauʻu Trail (C/E)
Haleakalā, 11-12 miles
Advanced hike through the Haleakalā crater from the Keoneheʻe Trailhead at 9740 ft. to Halemauʻu at 7990 ft. Hike goes down 3000 ft. in elevation and then back up 1000 ft. Must be in great physical shape and good with elevation changes. Bring 3+ liters of water, lunch and plenty of snacks, hat, sunscreen, warm clothing, rain jacket, binoculars, and sturdy closed toe hiking shoes. Meet 8:30 am at Pukalani Longs parking lot. Hike will take about 7-8 hours. At end of hike, optional stay to watch sunset and the stars come out. Note: Fee of $20/car to enter the Haleakalā National Park. Limit 12. Leader: Adriane Raff Corwin <adriane.raff-corwin@sierraclub.org > or 419-5143. Map of hike route: https://www.nps.gov/hale/planyourvisit/upload/Map-and-Descriptions-FINAL_Compressed-1.pdf

Sunday, September 17
Wailua Iki Stream Hike (E/C)
6 miles
Moderate hike through beautiful forest on winding muddy, jeep road. Pools, waterfalls and lush plant life. Bring appropriate footwear, sunscreen, lunch and water. Meet 8:00 am at Haiku Community Center. EMI waiver required (see above). Limit: 15. Leader: Rob Weltman <robw@worldspot.com> or 354-0490.

Sunday, September 24
Waiheʻe Ridge Hike (C)
5 miles
1200 ft elevation gain. Great workout with native plants, beautiful views! Bring rain jacket, lunch, water, hat, sunscreen. Meet 8:30 am at Waihee School parking lot. Limit 12. Leader: Miranda Camp <mauimiranda@hotmail.com> or 868-6848.

Saturday, September 30
Hāmākua Mālama Day (C/E/S)
Ha‘ikū, 4 miles
Monthly community service outing to remove trash and keep coastal trails open on 267 acres of Hamakua lands purchased by Maui County. Bring gloves/hand tools/water/hat/lunch/ sturdy shoes. Meet 9am at Ha‘ikū Community Center. Limit 15. Leader: Lucienne de Naie <laluz@maui.net> or 214-0147

EMI WAIVER REQUIRED FOR CERTAIN HIKES

To go on certain hikes, you need a waiver from East Maui Irrigation Company (EMI). If the hike description notes that you need a waiver then you absolutely must get one prior to the hike. (If there is no notation that the hike requires an EMI waiver, then you don’t need to worry about this.) One waiver covers all EMI hikes for the quarter of hikes listed currently. Call in your waiver request to EMI at 579-9516 well in advance to make an appointment for when you can sign it. Then go to EMI’s Pa’ia office at 497 Baldwin Avenue to sign the waiver. You will need to call to make sure someone will be there. Waivers CANNOT be mailed, faxed or emailed. Sierra Club Maui does not make the rules. EMI does. Please be considerate of EMI staff time and pick up waiver 5 days in advance whenever possible. THE WAIVER MUST BE BROUGHT ON THE HIKE AND SHOWN TO THE HIKE LEADER. Mahalo