Annual Meeting – Sunday, February 25th

Please join us for our Annual Meeting on Sunday, February 25th from 11 am – 3 pm at the Pāʻia Community Center.

  • Hear highlights from Maui Group’s work this past year
  • Get updates on our 2018 state legislative priorities and campaigns
  • Congratulate our 2018 Community Award Honorees (starts at 11:45 am)
  • Listen to a fascinating presentation on the effects of climate change on Maui and work being done to mitigate its effects, presented by Tara Owens of UH Sea Grant and Matthew Gonser of the O’ahu Office of Climate Change, Sustainability and Resiliency – and then participate in a brainstorming session on what more we can do on Maui

Lunch is generously being provided by Mana Foods and Flatbread Pizza. Bring a pupu to add to the potluck! This is a waste-free event – please bring your own utensils, plate, and cup.

Our 2018 Community Award Honorees are:

Mālama i ka ‘Āina Awards
Tom Reed, Roxanna Smith

Mālama Kahakai Award
Robin Knox

ʻOnipaʻa Awards
Kelly King, Scott Fisher

Volunteers of the Year
Wailea 670 Trail Crew

More details in the poster below –

 

Help Pass a State-Wide Ban on Oxybenzone!

Lahaina Injection Wells Lawsuit: Enough Already! Just Fix the Problem

The Honolulu Star-Advertiser agrees – Enough already, Maui County! Stop trying to appeal the lawsuit and start fixing the problem!

 

Call/Email the Mayor & Maui Council Chair and say “ENOUGH ALREADY! Stop wasting the public’s money to defend illegal injection wells in West Maui. Spend the money instead on fixing the problem!”

Mayor Alan Arakawa
270-7855
Mayors.Office@co.maui.hi.us

Council Chair Mike White
270-5507
mike.white@mauicounty.us

 

Background: $3 million down the toilet – Enough Already!

The County paid a main land law firm $3 million to defend its actions of injecting treated wastewater into the ocean without proper state oversight. The County was joined in its fight by the Association of American Railroads, the American Iron and Steel Institute, the American Petroleum Institute, the National Mining Association and the Fertilizer Institute.

The County lost the original court case but kept filing appeals – in total they’ve spent $3 million and lost all 4 times in court. Sierra Club Maui Group was one of 4 plaintiffs in the case, and just this month the County lost ANOTHER appeal.

The County COULD have used that money to build the infrastructure we need to support water recycling. Instead, now they’re talking about filing MORE appeals. Will this be another $3 million of public money down the toilet?

Call or email the mayor and council chair and say: Enough Already – Stop spending the public’s money on lawsuits and just fix the problem!

Campaign and meme from Tamara Paltin and http://www.savewestmaui.com
Mahalo!

Op-Ed: Maui’s most controversial permit was approved in only 29 minutes

http://www.mauinews.com/opinion/columns/2018/02/mauis-most-controversial-permit-was-approved-in-only-29-minutes/

Published as a Viewpoint Op-Ed in the Maui News on February 1, 2018

By Adriane Raff Corwin

It’s a matter of basic human decency to show respect toward each other’s ancestral remains. The Central Maui sand dunes are the resting place for thousands of iwi kupuna (ancestral bones), but landowner Maui Lani Partners has been allowed to illegally mine

hundred of thousands of tons of Central Maui sand and destroy countless burials in its Phase 9 site. Malama Kakanilua, a local group of cultural descendents and their supporters, is fighting to stop this desecration once and for all.

As a first step, County Council member Elle Cochran introduced legislation to establish a moratorium against all sand mining in Central Maui in spring 2017. It finally became law on Jan. 5 but included an exemption clause: Anyone with land in the moratorium area would be excused from it if they held a valid grading permit before the moratorium passed.

MLP’s Phase 9 permit was set to expire in late 2017, so it would not be able to get a new permit once the moratorium became law. But instead, in late November 2017, the Public Works Department quietly extended Maui Lani’s Phase 9 permit. The time stamp in the email exchange showed only 29 minutes passed between Public Works receiving MLP’s application for permit extension and the department’s approval of it. This made sure MLP’s Phase 9 site is exempt from the moratorium.

Public Works cannot claim that it was unaware of the controversy. In April 2017, Gina Mangieri of KHON2 did an expose on the scheme between development company MLP and cement company HC&D (formally Ameron) to mine thousands of tons of sand from MLP’s Phase 9 site, export it on barges and create cement for construction projects like Oahu’s rail. According to KHON2, MLP and HC&D’s joint owner, the Mills Group, made $30 million off Maui sand mining in 2016 alone. All of this was done with a simple grubbing and grading permit (No. G2014/0090); the Mills Group found loopholes in the law that allowed them to mine away the small amount of inland sand Maui has left.

Mayor Alan Arakawa called for a moratorium on sand mining but took no action, so Malama Kakanilua sent him a letter in May 2017 that explained why MLP’s Phase 9 permit should be revoked, including the fact that MLP provided incorrect information in its original application by checking “No” after the application question, “Are there known burials, cemeteries, or other historic sites on the property?” The land in question is a well-documented pre-contact burial ground, and this type of omission should warrant revocation and reevaluation.

David Goode, director of Public Works, signaled that he was aware of the controversy by writing a letter to the State Historic Preservation Division in July 2017, relating community testimony stating MLP did not have required archaeological monitors on hand during its work.

So, despite the fact that the original permit application included false information, new burials were found at the site, the council was working on a moratorium, Maui-Lana’i Burial Council was weighing a motion to preserve the burials in place, Malama Kakanilua filed a lawsuit against MLP, the judge issued a preliminary injunction in that suit to stop the mining, and the Planning Department sent a warning letter that MLP initially ignored, Public Works extended MLP’s Phase 9 permit in 29 minutes — without consulting any other pertinent agency or department.

Malama Kakanilua and Sierra Club Maui are calling on the county to revoke MLP’s permit extension as well as the grading permit granted to Waiko Industrials (also granted right before the moratorium for another highly sensitive burial area). We want a complete audit of the permitting process so that we: 1) get to the bottom of how the MLP permit was approved in the first place, and 2) ensure this blind approval process stops once and for all.

County government needs to make sure the mining stops. So far, Public Works has taken no action, so Cochran has introduced a new bill to remove the exemption clause from the moratorium law, which may be discussed at the Feb. 2 council meeting. We urge the public to stand up for decency and demand these burials be protected.

* Adriane Raff Corwin is the directing coordinator of Sierra Club of Hawai’i’s Maui Group.

9th Circuit Court Rules in Favor of SC Maui and allies!

Big Update!

The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that the county’s use of injection wells at the Lahaina Wastewater Reclamation Facility since the early 1980s violates the federal Clean Water Act. Sierra Club Maui, Surfrider Maui, the Hawai’i Wildlife Fund, and West Maui Preservation Association first brought the lawsuit in 2012. Read our lawyerʻs press release here.

Submit Comments on the Anaergia MANA Draft EIS

(Read about this issue in our previous post here  and in a Maui News article about the recently held public meeting.)

Anaergia/MANA has submitted a Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) to the county, which must be approved in a final form before the project can move forward.

The deadline to comment on this Draft EIS is Tuesday, February 6, 2018.

We urge Sierra Club Maui members and supporters to submit comments on the Draft EIS.

At first glance, the project might look eco-conscious and economically viable – but when you delve into the details, it becomes very clear this project has not been properly vetted. 

Here is the announcement of the Draft EIS (PDF) in the December 23, 2017 OEQCʻs The Environmental Notice.

The Draft EIS is available for download here (large PD).

 

Comments should be emailed to: